All Historical articles – Page 5

  • Pablo Ferrandez stradivari
    Video

    Comparing 3 Stradivari cellos

    2019-08-02T11:58:00Z

    Pablo Ferrández visits the Nippon Music Foundation to compare the 1696 'Lord Aylesford' cello he has on loan with two others by Stradivari, the 1730 'De Munck, Feuermann' and the 1736 'Ladenburg' (part of the 'Paganini' quartet).  

  • Mystery_5Sept2014
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    From the Archive: a violin by Giovanni Grancino, Milan 1714

    2019-08-01T09:00:00Z

    This illustration of a violin by Giovanni Grancino was published in The Strad, April 1914. The following text is extracted from the article accompanying the photographs: Of the various Grancini, the instruments of Giovanni (1675-1737) are probably best known. Those of his father, sons, and various other relatives are ...

  • Rose
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    An unexpected twist

    2019-07-31T15:10:00Z

    The few remaining guitars by Antonio Stradivari have distinctive characteristics – which proved useful when another example came to light recently in a museum collection. Emiliano Marinucci and Lorenzo Frignani tell the story

  • Dai Ting Chung
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    The Jewel of Taiwan: The Strad Calendar 2020

    2019-07-31T15:00:00Z

    The Chimei Museum in Taiwan houses the largest collection of stringed instruments in the world.The Strad Calendar 2020 marks 30 years since its founding, as Dai-Ting Chung and Andrew Guan highlight some of the remarkable treasures within its walls

  • 1 front and back
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    In focus: a c.1930 violin by Ignacio Fleta

    2019-07-25T16:38:00Z

    Jordi Pinto examines an instrument by the important Spanish maker

  • Fussen lute and violin making
    Review

    Book review: Füssen Lute and Violin Making; A European Legacy

    2019-07-25T12:55:00Z

    John Dilworth reviews a history of lutherie in the southern German town

  • Mystery_Instrument_Feb28_2014
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    From the archive: a violin by Jacob Stainer, 1669

    2019-07-24T12:00:00Z

    This illustration of a 1669 Jacob Stainer violin was published in The Strad, August 1934. The following text is extracted from an article accompanying the photographs: Jacobus Stainer’s instruments were always German in style, although the master was immeasurably in advance of his countrymen. That he was acquainted with ...

  • Gabrielli crop
    Feature

    In focus: c.1767 violin by G.B. Gabrielli

    2019-07-19T12:02:00Z

    Kai Dase takes a close look at a violin by one of the finest and most influential Florentine makers of the 18th century

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    In focus: a 1626 cello by Andrea Guarneri

    2019-07-17T00:10:00Z

    Julian Hersh examines an instrument from one of the most important families of Italian violin makers

  • Joseph Tarr_Scroll Side 2 1
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    Northern double bass makers: Northern lights

    2019-07-17T00:07:00Z

    The 19th century witnessed a thriving double bass making scene in the Manchester area of England. This northern school, which had its own distinct style points, flourished for a longer time than its southern counterpart, as Thomas Martin, Martin Lawrence and George Martin explain

  • Mini Time Machine Museum of Miniatures
    Gallery

    10 unusual violins

    2019-06-18T13:28:00Z

    Ten violins that fly in the face of conformity

  • Brian Paul Benning
    Video

    Brian Paul Benning plays a 1997 Viola d’amore

    2019-06-17T16:00:00Z

    Brian Paul Benning - Artist-in-Residence at the 65-year-old family-run business Benning Violins in Los Angeles, California - plays a Viola d’amore crafted by violinmaker Eric Benning in 1997.

  • Screen Shot 2019-06-12 at 17.28.20
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    In focus: a 1782 cello by William Forster II

    2019-06-01T15:21:00Z

    Bradley Strauchen-Scherer examines an instrument from Britain’s foremost dynasty of violin and cello makers

  • 1672-1713
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    Curiouser and curiouser

    2019-06-01T13:36:00Z

    Was the 1672 ‘Mahler’ the first viola ever made by Antonio Stradivari? As Jonathan Marolle explains, this is just one of the unanswerable questions that arise when studying this fascinating instrument

  • Milanollo crop
    Focus

    In focus: the 1728 'Milanollo' Stradivari

    2019-05-31T14:15:00Z

    Roger Hargrave examines the Stradivari ‘Milanollo’ violin of 1728, one of the few of the master’s instruments to keep its original sharpness

  • Archinto crop
    Focus

    In focus: the 1696 Stradivari 'Archinto' viola

    2019-05-17T12:22:00Z

    John Dilworth praises the archetypal beauty of Stradivari’s ‘Archinto’ viola, a magical example of form and aesthetic

  • Cannone museum case
    Video

    Paganini's 'Il Cannone' violin played in Columbus, Ohio

    2019-05-16T11:34:00Z

    This clip from the Columbus Dispatch shows Columbus Symphony concertmaster Joanna Frankel trying out ‘Il Cannone’, Paganini’s favourite violin, during its weeklong stay at the Columbus Museum of Art. The violin, made in 1743 by Guarneri ‘Del Gesù’, was nicknamed ‘Il Cannone’ (the cannon) by Paganini because of its ...

  • Photo of Heifetz with Michael Yurkevitch (left) and Mr Rosenthal (right) from PM, 22 April, 1941
    Focus

    Jascha Heifetz – champion of modern violins

    2019-05-15T13:00:00Z

    Dario Sarlo reveals a lesser-known passion of the great violinist, and how it led him to start his own lutherie competition

  • Cannone
    Video

    Paganini's violin arrives in Columbus, Ohio

    2019-05-11T16:21:00Z

    This clip from WCMH news in Columbus, Ohio, shows ‘Il Cannone’, Paganini’s favourite violin, arriving for a weeklong stay at the Columbus Museum of Art. The violin, made in 1743 by Guarneri ‘Del Gesù’, was nicknamed ‘Il Cannone’ (the cannon) by Paganini because of its power and projection. ...

  • Figure 7. Smith_MS_21_PG (4.19 cmyk)
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    Forms of mystery

    2019-05-10T22:48:00Z

    Andrea Zanrè and Philip Ihle conclude their examination of Stradivari’s moulds, with the aid of micro-CT imaging by Rudolf Hopfner, by exploring whether the Cremonese master may have used more than the twelve forms that survive in the Museo del Violino