November 2018

2. Front Cover 580x800

  • Paul Rolland: Examining the legacy of a great American violin pedagogue forty years after his death
  • The 1724 ‘Cecil’ Stradivari violin
  • The struggles of female luthiers in a male-dominated business
  • The Colorado-based National Repertory Orchestra at 60
  • Cecilia Zilliacus recording the Brahms concerto
  • William Kroll beyond Banjo and Fiddle
  • Postcards from the International Violin Competition of Indianapolis and the Aspen Music Festival
  • In Focus: A 1588 violin by Antonio Amati
  • Trade Secrets: David Polstein offers a new method for resawing rib stock
  • My Space: Yonkers-based luthier Ron Fletcher
  • Making Matters: John Simmers on using antiquing methods to give an instrument a feeling of warmth
  • Life Lessons: The memories and opinions of Russian violinist Viktoria Mullova
  • Opinion: Artists making MTV-style videos
  • Postcard from Indiana: The International Violin Competition of Indianapolis
  • Postcard from Colorado: Report from the Aspen Music Festival
  • Masterclass: Carolin Widmann discusses Schumann’s Violin Sonata no.2 in D minor
  • Technique: Violin pedagogue Marianne Piketty hands on hints and tips on playingmartelé
  • Sentimental Work: James Ehnes on his relationship with Beethoven’s Violin Concerto

In this month’s digital edition:

  • Get up close and personal with the 1724 ‘Cecil’ Stradivari and our In focus instrument, a 1588 Antonio Amati – including extra images not seen in the print magazine
  • More from the tour of New York luthier Ron Fletcher’s workshop in My Space
  • Extra photos from the International Violin Competition of Indianapolis, including images of all six finalists
  • More from the Aspen Music Festival, the subject of this month’s Postcard from Colorado
  • And of course, audio clips from our three ‘The Strad Recommends’ recordings this month 
  • PLUS: Every single weblink, including the advertisements, is now live – tap straight to your favourite online content

The digital magazine and print edition are on sale now.

Do YOU have something to say about the new issue – or about the strings world generally? Send letters to the editor at thestrad@thestrad.com.

SUBSCRIBE TO THE STRAD

Since its launch in 1890, the magazine has brought its readers the best features, comment and analysis on all issues of interest to string teachers, players, students, instrument makers and enthusiasts. Authoritative, trusted and influential, The Strad keeps readers informed about the latest news, ground-breaking research and techniques in all aspects of playing and making stringed instruments through its print and digital platforms.

Included in subscription:

  • Twelve issues delivered direct to your door
  • Two posters showcasing exemplary instruments from the great makers of the past
  • The Strad Directory: the essential guide for the string music industry, with global listings for businesses, artisans and organisations
  • String Courses: international short courses for players and makers
  • Degrees: a directory of courses for string players and teachers worldwide
  • Accessories: Reviews and features on essential items for your instrument case and workshop

Subscribe Now

 

MISSED AN ISSUE?

Download every recent edition of The Strad now

  • November 2018

  • October 2018

  • September 2018

  • August 2018

  • July 2018

  • June 2018

  • May 2018

  • April 2018

  • March 2018

  • February 2018

  • January 2018

  • December 2017

  • November 2017

  • October 2017

  • September 2017

  • August 2017

  • July 2017

  • June 2017

  • May 2017

  • April 2017

  • March 2017

  • February 2017

  • January 2017

  • December 2016

  • November 2016

Stradivari’s brilliant red varnishes

conservatoire auditions

 

 

Gingold, Heifetz and Galamian

 

 

 

The record-breaking c.1773 ‘Sinzheimer’ violin by G.B. Guadagnini

A jig for arching corrections

Russian-born luthier Yuri Pochekin

Steve Rossow’s various techniques for teaching violin making

 

Australian violist and composer Brett Dean

 

 

British cellist Guy Johnston discusses Mendelssohn’s Variations op.17

gives his ingenious strategies for functional fingering

explains his love for Myaskovsky’s 1944-5 Cello Concerto