PEOPLE

Tanja Becker-Bender

Wednesday, 04 December 2013

An unnerving experience turned into a stroke of fortune for the German violinist

A great moment does not always need conventional planning

A few years ago, I was scheduled to perform a Concerto in E minor by Rodolphe Kreutzer. At the rehearsal, which took place hours before the first concert, I was shocked to discover that, due to a misunderstanding, the orchestra had been working on a different Kreutzer E minor Concerto from me. It was Friday afternoon and there was no chance of getting different materials at the last minute. After we had got over the initial shock, the conductor, Dennis Russell Davies, advised me to follow my instinct and perform a piece I really wanted to, instead of relying on a standard concerto replacement. I chose Bartók’s Sonata for Solo Violin, one of my favourite pieces.

As a result of this spontaneity, it became a memorable performance and I felt a great connection with everyone in the hall. It was not a problem for the audience, or for the orchestra as it waited patiently and listened on stage. The experience showed me that a great moment like that does not always need the conventional planning that normally comes with a concert.

Photo: Marco Borggreve

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