PEOPLE

Richard Harwood

Monday, 05 August 2013

The British cellist reflects on musical shaping and a holistic way of performing

'Time must be given to take in and appreciate the beauty'

I think what resonates most in my mind whenever I perform are all the things I heard in my early years about musical shape and journeying through music. For example: listeners should feel the distance you travel in a shift; they are always being taken on a journey; and if musical passages are similar, both the player and the music are still moving, and still getting nearer or further away from something. I learnt this in a variety of ways from all my teachers, including Ralph Kirshbaum, Heinrich Schiff and David Waterman, as well as in many masterclasses with Steven Isserlis.

However, the person who got me started thinking in this holistic way was the wonderful Joan Dickson. She would tell me how, on every journey, there would be beauty spots that one would pass, and that time must be given to take in and appreciate that beauty, instead of rushing through the moment.

Originally published in The Strad, August 2013. Subscribe to The Strad or download our digital edition as part of a 30-day free trial.

Photo: Paul Mitchell/EMI Classics

Limited time only offer - 42% off
COMMENTS
comments

POST A COMMENT

Captcha
 
Cookie
serene violin solo pre-1917
Hi folks. For a story I'm writing I'd like suggestions for the most serene and...
Strings
I want to try some new strings on my violin. It's English, 1875, and has quite...
violin left hand position
I have a new student , quite advanced, who has a 'double jointed' left thumb...
Electric violin and bows stolen in London
My friend John Garner's asking for help regarding his electric violin. Please...
FOLLOW US
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • YouTube
    YouTube
  • Google+
    GooglePlus
THE STRAD'S NEWSLETTER

Reading The Strad puts you at the top of your game - Save 42% off a subscription today. That’s £22.41/ €49.95/ $51.88

View
X